Practical Tips From Top WordPress Pros

Practical Tips From Top WordPress Pros Recently I shared with you some advice from the WordPress community to beginners. But what if starting out is already a dim memory? What if you’re already so immersed in the world of WordPress that you dream of Trac and you bore your partner with talk of your latest achievement with custom post types?

Below are some tips from WordPress pros from across the community. Many of the tips cover development, but there’s also advice on business, running your website and, of course, getting involved with the community.

Wordpress-start-image
Image: Phil Oakley

Tips For Developers

USE EVERYTHING WORDPRESS HAS TO OFFER

WordPress’ core can do a lot for you, without you having to write a bunch of code. WordPress is much more powerful when you make use of its APIs and built-in functionality. “If you use WordPress as your framework,” says Trent Lapinski, “it will enable you to focus on developing an innovative plugin or theme.”

Matty Cohen recommends always looking for and using functionality available within WordPress before creating a function from scratch. “Examples of this include, at the higher level, using the WordPress Settings API and, at the lower level, using themedia_handle_upload() function to upload your files, rather than a custom upload routine.” Matty gives an example of this with his WooSlider plugin. In order to create a familiar and consistent experience for WooThemes users, he did the following:

  • He used the Settings API for the settings screen.
  • He added a tab to the “Upload/Insert Media” popup for creating shortcodes. This interface uses a combination of the Settings API, custom form-creation logic, and some custom JavaScript to create the HTML output and the shortcode.

Screenshot of WooSlider settings
WooSlider uses built-in WordPress functionality to make the user experience better.

Making use of everything WordPress has to offer results in less coding for you and a better overall experience for users. But those aren’t the only benefits. Amy Hendrix points out that the code you write will be future-proof. Writing your own scripts could eventually result in conflicts.

USE HOOKS

Hooks are the means by which you hook into WordPress and add your own code without modifying core files. There are two types of hooks: actions and filters. Action hooks are places where you can insert and run code. Filters are used to manipulate output.

If you’re working with WordPress’ core and with plugins and themes, then you should be extending by making use of all of the hooks available. Adam Brown maintains a list of all of the hooks that have ever appeared in WordPress.

IMPLEMENT HOOKS

Create your own hooks. By implementing hooks in your plugins and themes, you create opportunities for other people to extend them and create add-ons. Shane Pearlmanbelieves that by doing so, you “encourage plugin developers to make opportunities for the community to extend and also use them.”

Not only does this create opportunities for other developers, but you make life easier for yourself. “With a ‘well-hooked’ theme or plugin,” says Simon Wheatley, “you can make adjustments between clients, or between sites on a multisite setup, a lot more easily than by effectively forking your own code for every scenario.”

WRITE SECURE CODE

If you write plugins or themes, keeping the code secure is critical. How bad would you feel if your code was responsible for websites getting hacked? Brad Williamsrecommends learning how data validation pertains to WordPress. A detailed page on data validation can be found in the Codex; so, if you’re a developer, you have no excuse for writing insecure WordPress plugins and themes. Following the guidelines will ensure that your code is safe and secure from exploits and hacks. As Ryan Hellyer points out, “Having a beautiful website which does exactly what a client requires is great, but it’s not so great when it gets injected with spam links and is de-indexed from search engines!”

FOLLOW BEST PRACTICES

Ryan Duff and Brad Williams highlight some best practices that developers should stick to:

  • Make sure the data that you’re passing is always being passed in the way it’s expected to. Setting a variable on an incorrect line could result in a trickle-down effect of error messages.
  • WordPress has coding standards, so stick to them. This will keep your code in a format that all WordPress developers will recognize, making bug tracking much easier!

EMBRACE THE CODE BASE

Both Helen Hou-Sandi and Jake Goldman of 10up recommend that you spend time looking at the code base. As Jake points out, “Relying on the Codex and Google searches for solving unique problems with WordPress is like trying to tune a car’s performance without ever looking under the hood.” Rachel Baker also suggests looking at the change logs, and Silviu-Cristian Burcă points us to his advice in “How to Become a WordPress Guru.”

A good integrated development environment (IDE) for PHP — such as NetBeans, PhpStorm, phpDesigner or Vanilla Eclipse — will offer code auto-completion for WordPress functions and their arguments and will display documentation on functions inline. You’ll be able to easily jump to function and class declarations to study them. “Think the core code base is too scary?” asks Jake. “Pick a file in wp-includes and start reading — you might be surprised by how approachable it is, and how much you can learn.”

Looking at the code, as Helen adds, also increases the likelihood that you’ll find a way to contribute code to the WordPress project. You’ll also become familiar with plugins and themes, understand how people do things properly, and recognize when they get it wrong.

SHARE YOUR CODE

It’s in the nature of code in an open-source project to be shared, forked and iterated on. If you’re working on solutions, then share them with the community. “Share and publish your solutions, as a plugin, widget or theme,” says Cátia Kitahara. “Not for every project, but with most of them, we end up with a solution that could be of use to many others. So, do it as a way of giving back to the community. I know it takes time to prepare something to be distributed through the repositories, but remember the time WordPress saves for us!”

You could put your code on GitHub, which Ben Balter recommends:

“GitHub’s got a very different culture, and the ability for anyone to submit a pull request is a real game changer. It really lowers the barrier to contribute, and democratizes the entire plugin authoring experience. As a bonus, use GitHub’s built-in wiki functionality to maintain your plugin’s documentation (especially FAQ), so that anyone, even non-technical users, can contribute.

Lastly, if you have plugin tests, integrate with Travis CI so that you can automatically test pull requests before merging. To help you get started, a handful of tools are out there, such as GitHub → WordPress.org deployment scripts and GitHub wiki → WordPress readme converters.”

Eric Mann points out that if you’ve built your project in isolation, then you’re likely missing out on different approaches. Sharing your code with people gives them the opportunity to point out how it can be improved. WordPress itself is built collaboratively and is the result of hundreds of minds looking at it from different perspectives. If you want your code to excel, you should be sharing it, too.

USE CUSTOM POST TYPES

Taking advantage of custom post types for specific use cases is a great way to leverage WordPress. At the Theme Foundry, Drew Strojny has three custom post types: themes, stories and tutorials. This enables members of his team to quickly find and create content.

Drew recommends making custom post types even more flexible by adding custom meta data. This enables you to style your content and provides opportunities to reuse that meta data across your website. He provides the example of the meta data he uses with the “Story” post type in use on his “Customer Stories” page.

from : http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2013/03/20/practical-tips-top-wordpress-pros/

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The Options For WordPress Theme Development

At the recent WordCamp Edinburgh, I took part in a panel discussion about WordPress theme development and the options available to developers when building themes. The overriding conclusion from the session was that there isn’t a one-size-fits-all answer and that the best method depends on the needs of the website and the capabilities of the developer.

But if you’re starting out building WordPress themes or want to develop a system for building them more efficiently or robustly, how do you decide which approach to take? In this article, we’ll briefly describe how WordPress themes work and then look at some of the different approaches to developing them, with tips on which approach might be most suitable for your website and circumstances.

How Does A WordPress Theme Work?

In WordPress, themes drive a website and determine what it contains, how it behaves and what it looks like. The theme is separate from the content, which is held in the database. This means you can use the same theme on more than one website, regardless of the content of the websites — which you might already be doing if you’ve downloaded themes from WordPress’ theme repository.

 

What To Consider When Developing A WordPress Theme?

Before deciding which approach to take to develop your theme, identify your constraints. These likely include the following:

  • Time
    How much time do you have to develop your theme, or to learn how to do it?
  • Budget
    This is related to time but also has to do with whether you can afford to pay for a premium theme or a theme framework.
  • Capability
    How familiar are you with theme development, with CSS and PHP and with how themes work? If you’re not familiar, how much do you want to learn?
  • Future-proofing
    Will your theme need to be updated in future? Will other developers be working on it in addition to you? If so, then your approach will need to be as robust as possible.
  • Repetition
    Do you see yourself developing a number of similar themes in future? If so, your approach will have to allow for code to be reused.

We’ll revisit these considerations at the end of the article and identify which development options are most suitable for various situations.

Theme Development: Your Options

A few options are available for developing your theme or themes, and investigating them before you roll your sleeves up and start coding would be worthwhile. Picking the right approach will result in a better theme, with more robust code, and it will minimize the amount of revisions you’ll have to do later. It will also help you to build the theme more efficiently.

The options we’ll look at here are:

  • Build a theme from scratch,
  • Edit (or “hack,” some might say) an existing theme,
  • Use the theme customizer to tweak an existing theme,
  • Create a child theme to make changes to an existing theme,
  • Create your own parent theme (using one of the approaches above) and child themes,
  • Use a theme framework.

1. BUILD A THEME FROM SCRATCH

This approach is the most difficult if you’re inexperienced. But if you’re a seasoned WordPress developer, it will give you the most control. It might be the most appropriate method if you’re importing HTML from an existing static website that is being upgraded to WordPress with no other changes.

However, when transferring a website to WordPress, conducting a review of it as part of the process, rather than simply copying the code across, is a good idea. If you are copying a static website, you’ll need to keep a close eye on your code to ensure that it’s clean, efficient and valid.

2. EDIT (OR HACK) AN EXISTING THEME

This is how most people start with WordPress theme development: in working on a theme that they’ve downloaded, they see that some styling isn’t quite right, so they delve into the style sheet and make some edits. Starting like this is tempting because it feels like a quick and easy way to achieve the effect you want. But there are some dangers:

  • If you ever switch themes, that update will override any changes you’ve made.
  • It’s easy to add repetitive code by adding new styles lower down in the style sheet that override styles higher up, rather than removing what you don’t need.
  • The website could end up with a lot more code than it needs.
  • If the theme isn’t well coded or commented to begin with, you could get yourself into a bigger mess and find that you have to make a lot of fixes.

However, hacking a theme can work if you go into it with your eyes open. It may be an option if the following are true:

  • The theme you’re using is well written, valid and commented (e.g., the default WP theme, Twenty Eleven);
  • The changes you’re making are so drastic that you wouldn’t need to update the original theme;
  • You understand the PHP and CSS contained in the theme and are comfortable editing, adding to and removing it without breaking the theme.

If you do decide to go down this route, keeping a backup of the original theme and commenting your code thoroughly are important. I would also advise commenting out any code that you don’t want and then testing to see what happens before deleting anything.

3. USE THE THEME CUSTOMIZER TO TWEAK AN EXISTING THEME

The theme customizer was released with WordPress 3.4. It gives you the option to customize a theme without writing any code, simply by using a WYSIWYG interface. Depending on how well the customizer is written into the theme itself, you can use it to change images, titles, colors and even the layout. Expect to see more themes with the customizer integrated into them.

Using the WordPress theme customizer with the Twenty Ten theme.
Using the WordPress theme customizer with the Twenty Ten theme.

The theme customizer stores your changes in a separate file, not in the theme’s style sheet, so there will be repetitive code.

For more information, take a look at Otto on WordPress’ video tutorial or guide to integrating the theme customizer into your own themes.

4. CREATE A CHILD THEME TO MAKE CHANGES TO AN EXISTING THEME

This approach is similar to editing an existing theme, but safer. It consists of creating a brand new theme that is defined as a child of the existing theme. Where your child theme doesn’t have a particular file but the parent theme does, it will use that. Where the child theme does have a file, that file will override the equivalent in the parent. This line tells the browser to load the parent theme’s style sheet before rendering any of the styles in the current style sheet. This frees you from having to duplicate any styles in the parent theme that you want to use.

So, that’s how child themes work. But when is this the best approach? I would suggest using it in the following cases:

  • You already have a theme (to be used as the parent) that contains most of what you need for your theme;
  • You want to be able to update your parent theme (for example, when theme updates are released following a WordPress update);
  • You don’t want to get tied up in knots from hacking an existing theme;
  • You want the option to revert to the parent theme or to develop another similar theme in future (which would be a new child theme);
  • You’re developing a number of similar websites with some minor stylistic or content differences (I did this when building similar websites for a client that owned multiple companies);
  • The difference between your child and parent themes is not so huge that you need to start from scratch, or not so huge that your child theme’s code will override anything affected by updates to the parent theme.

 

from : http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2013/03/13/a-guide-to-wordpress-theme-options/

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Improve WordPress Theme Development Process

There is so much to learn about WordPress theme development. The Internet is home to hundreds of articles about building WordPress themes, to countless theme frameworks that will help you get started, and to endless WordPress themes, some of which are beautiful and professional but not a few of which are (to be honest) a bit crappy.

Rather than write another article on building a WordPress theme (which would be silly, really, since any theme I build would fall into the “crappy” category), I’ve asked some of the top theme designers and developers to share some tips and techniques to help you improve and refine your theme development and design process.

Before we get into that, Mark Forrester, cofounder of WooThemes, has shared some insight into his firm’s development process. Given WooThemes’ success, no doubt we can all learn something from it.

A Peek Into Woo

Whether you work in a large theme shop or are a lone designer, you can learn plentyfrom another designer or developer’s workflow.

  1. A theme at WooThemes starts life on the ideas board, through specifications provided by the community or based on a concept that’s emerged from customer research. It is designed either in house or by an industry-leading designer who is hired on contract.
  2. The theme is then meticulously designed in Photoshop. All of the major elements are styled and the pages constructed before any code is touched. Mark recommends Photoshop Etiquette for guidelines on structuring your design file. He says, “The better the Photoshop file, the easier the theme build.”
  3. Once the design is approved, it’s assigned to a developer, who works from WooThemes’ base theme. This includes the templates that come with every WooTheme, along with basic styling. The base theme has a responsive layout, and the CSS is managed using LESS, which Mark strongly recommends.
  4. Theme development is managed with Trello, and milestones are set withTeamGantt.
  5. Once the theme is finalized, the developer creates a demo for the website that is populated with dummy content and that tests almost every element of the design.
  6. The team sets about beta testing the theme. A list of bugs, tweaks and solutions is compiled, a hackathon is scheduled, and everything is completed by the developer.
  7. For WooThemes’ own redesign (which is awesome — congrats, guys!), the team started to use BugHerd, which helped them gather user feedback and track it directly in the pages.
  8. All revisions are included in the change log for easy reference. A strict numbering convention distinguishes between bug fixes and new features.

That’s a lot of process right there. Creating a WooTheme theme is about much more than knocking out a few lines of code. Here’s what Mark has to say:

“When we create and edit our themes it is not simply diving into the code. We have to carefully consider our community of users and how any code might impact their usage, and the template files’ customization ability.”

Apart from workflow, what else can be learned from professional theme designers and developers?

Develop Locally

If you’re not developing locally, then now’s the time to start. Here’s what Chris Coyier has to say about it:

“Designers and developers who work mostly on WordPress sites are, in my experience, the worst offenders of the “just do it live” development system. FTP commandos, if you will. I know — I was one for a lot of years. I suspect it’s the case because there are quite a few requirements to run a WordPress site locally: an Apache server running PHP and a MySQL database.

These things aren’t preinstalled on most computers like they are on most servers. Even if you get over those hurdles, setting up a workflow between local and live isn’t trivial.”

Luckily for you, Chris is going to show you a better way. Developing locally is easy to get started with.

STEP 2: GET OFF FTP

Developing locally has so many benefits. In particular, you’ll be able to do the following:

  • Have a record of everything that has ever changed and when it changed.
  • Roll back mistakes.
  • Become more efficient by using text-editor features such as “Find in Project.”
  • Work on major redesigns without worrying about screwing up a live website.

ALTERNATIVE TOOLS FOR A LOCAL SERVER

Use Live Reload

When you’re developing a theme, switching to the browser and reloading the page gets old pretty fast. That’s why Drew Strojny, founder of The Theme Foundry and the guy behind WordPress’ gorgeous new Twenty Twelve default theme, uses LiveReload:

“LiveReload is a great little application that works through a browser extension. LiveReload automatically reloads your page when a file has been changed in your project.

This is a huge productivity boon when you’re editing and tweaking a WordPress theme. All those small page refreshes add up to a big chunk of time saved at the end of the day. Not to mention, your fingers get a much needed break!”

The Theme Foundry loves LiveReload so much that it’s built support for it into Forge, its free command-line toolkit for bootstrapping and developing WordPress themes.

Use Git

Git is a distributed version-control system that is popular among developers all over the world. The great thing about Git is that you can quickly create a branch, make changes within that branch and then test those changes without affecting the master version. It’s what The Theme Foundry uses for every project:

“Quite honestly, we’d be lost without it. Git makes branching cheap and easy. You can experiment quickly with different ideas without worrying about getting lost. Think of it like the trail of pebbles left by Hansel and Gretel to help them find their way back home.

Git gives you the power to leave nicely annotated pebbles along your development path. If you see something interesting and wander off the trail, but then later change your mind, you can always get back to where you started.”

LEARNING GIT

 

from : http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2013/02/21/wp-theme-development-process/

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The WordPress Theme Customizer

In case you missed it, WordPress release 3.4 included a very exciting new development: the Theme Customizer. This allows users to tweak theme settings using a WYSIWYG interfaceand customize the theme so it includes the colors, fonts, text — and pretty much anything else — they want.

WordPress 3.4 allows you to make extensive customizations to a theme, including colors, fonts, and text.
WordPress 3.4 allows you to make extensive customizations to a theme, including colors, fonts, and text.

The purists out there may be throwing their hands up in horror — a WYSIWYG interface! Letting users alter themes themselves! Surely that opens the floodgates for the creation of thousands of ugly, messy WordPress websites? Well, yes, there is a risk of that. But more importantly, the Customizer means that if you’re developing custom themes for client websites, or themes for other developers to use, you have a whole new set of tools to play with.

With the Theme Customizer:

  • If you’re developing free or premium themes for others to use, integrating the Customizer will make your themes much more appealing to developers and website owners.
  • If you’re building client websites, you can let your client tweak the template content of their website such as the logo, tagline and contact details in a more intuitive way than by using a theme options page.
  • For both groups, you can let website users and developers make changes without having to rely on widgets or theme options pages — a less risky and less time-consuming approach.

So, let’s start by having a look at what the Theme Customizer is and how it works for the user.

How The Theme Customizer Works For Users

The Theme Customizer has been integrated into the Twenty Eleven Theme, so you can try it out using that theme. There’s a great video on the Ottopress blog showing you how the Customizer works with Twenty Eleven. Using it is simple:

  1. On the “Themes” page, search for and activate the Twenty Eleven Theme.
  2. On the same page, click on the “Customize” link under the current theme’s description.

The “Customize” link is right below the current theme's description on the “Themes” page.
The “Customize” link is right below the current theme’s description on the “Themes” page. Larger view.

  1. This brings up the Theme Customizer in the left column, along with a preview of your website on the right.

The theme customizer shown with the twenty eleven theme
The Customizer options are shown side-by-side with a preview of your website, so you can test the effect of changes. Larger view.

  1. To make changes, all you have to do is select each of the available options and edit their settings. The options are:
    • Site title and tagline
      Edit the title and tagline of the website without having to go to the “Settings” page.
    • Colors
      In the Twenty Eleven theme, you can only change the color of the header text and website background, but as we’ll see, this can potentially be used for much more.
    • Header image
      Choose from one of the default images or remove the header image altogether.
    • Background image
      Upload an image to use as the background of the website. The image below is what happens when I upload an image of some hang gliders to my website. The image can be tiled but unfortunately doesn’t stretch.

You can set your background image to tile, but not stretch.
You can set your background image to tile, but not stretch. Larger view.

    • Navigation
      Select which menu you want to use for the primary navigation of your website.
    • Static Front Page
      Specify whether the front page of the website should be a listing of your latest posts, or a static page of your choosing.
  1. Once you’ve made the changes you want, you must click the “Save & Publish” button. Until this is clicked, none of the changes are reflected in the live website. This means you can play to your heart’s content without your visitors seeing your experiments.

Another really exciting way to use the customizer is when previewing themes. If a theme has the Customizer built in, you can use it to make tweaks before downloading and activating the theme.

This demonstrates the Customizer in action with the Twenty Eleven theme, but what about your own themes? How would you harness this to add more functionality in themes you are selling or developing for clients?

So let’s take a look at how to implement Customizer in your theme, and how to add your own customization options.

 

 

from : http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2013/03/05/the-wordpress-theme-customizer-a-developers-guide/

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Child Themes for WP Framework

The theme framework you’ve built will be used as a parent theme in the sites you develop. This means that in each case you’ll need to create a child theme to create a unique site with its own design and with extra or different functions compared to the framework.

The obvious way to go about this is to dive in and start creating template files in your child theme to override those in the framework, but thanks to the action and filter hooks you’ve added to your framework, this might not always be the best approach.

In this article, I’ll outline some of the techniques you can use in your child themes to make best use of your framework and improvise your workflow.

The topics I’ll cover are as follows:

Creating starter child themes
Amending code via the framework’s filter hooks
Adding code via the framework’s action hooks
Creating template files in your child theme
When to use a plugin instead
Creating Starter Child Themes framework

The main purpose of developing your theme framework is to adopt the DRY (Don’t Repeat Yourself) principle, and that applies to your child themes, too.

It can make you more efficient if you create one or more ‘starter’ child themes for use with your framework, which contain the core code you need to get started on new projects.

When deciding how to go about doing this, consider the way you work and the sites you build:

Do you create a lot of sites for clients in the same sector with similar needs?
Do you want to offer low cost template based sites to smaller clients?
Are there specific template files you tend to create for most of your new projects?
Is there functionality you need to include on some sites but not others? (For example, I use two starter child themes, one with comment functionality and one without.)
Is there styling you tend to use for most projects, or can you use object oriented styling or a CSS preprocessor for most projects?
Are there libraries or resources you use for most new projects, or for a significant proportion of them?
Do you have two or three main categories you can place projects under, with each category involving similar development work?
If you’ve answered yes to any of these questions, then developing one or more starter child themes may save you time. You can create a set of child themes with the basic code that you repeat across all projects using them, and then you don’t need to rewrite that code (or create those files) for each new project.

Note on caveat: If you’re adding some code to every single new project, you may want to add it to your framework instead of to child themes, maybe by using a hook so you can override it if a different need arises in the future.

Even if you answered no to the questions above, it’s worth creating a very basic starter theme with an empty stylesheet and functions file, and adding the instructions WordPress needs to access your framework’s parent theme .

You might also want to create a starter functions.php file with the functions you most frequently use in your child themes. You can then choose to remove any of these and/or add to them for specific projects.

Amending Code via Filter Hooks

As well as adding styling to your child theme, you’ll most likely want to make changes to the code output by the framework. The most lightweight way of doing this is via filter hooks, so it’s worth exploring those first to identify if you can use any of them.

Creating a function which you then attach to a filter hook is much more efficient than creating a whole new template file for the new code; however, if you find yourself doing this repeatedly with the same filter hook, you might want to consider changing that filter hook to an action hook and writing a new function for each project which you activate via that action hook.

To be more efficient, you might want to create a set of relevant functions which you place in the functions file of different start themes or even create a plugin with your function which you activate when needed. I’ll cover plugins in more detail later in this series.

Adding Code via Action Hooks

Your theme framework will also have action hooks which you can use to insert content in various places in your sites.

If you’ve been working on the code files for the framework bundled with this tutorial series, you’ll have seven action hooks to work with:

before the header
inside the header
before the content
after the content
in the sidebar
in the footer
after the footer.
To do this, create a functions.php file in your child theme and .

There is plenty of other content you could add using your action hooks, such as sharing buttons above or below the content, extra content in the footer, a search box in the header and much more.

You might just want to add some content on specific page types, such as single blog posts, in which case the most obvious place to start would be by creating a newsingle.php template. But you can still use your action hooks with the addition of a conditional tag.

Creating New Template Files

On occasion you won’t be able to do what you want using the filter or action hooks in your framework, in which case you’ll need to create new template files in your child themes.

These might be the same template files as are stored in your framework, in which case the files in the child theme will override them. Or they might be new template files, for example for a new category, taxonomy or post type.

If you are creating template files in your child themes, it makes things easier if you use the template files in your framework as a starting point. The steps I follow are:

Identify the template file you need to create with reference to the WordPress template hierarchy
Create a blank file with the appropriate name in your child theme
Identify the file in your framework which is closest to the new file (again with reference to the template hierarchy)
Copy the contents of that into your new file
Make amendments to the new file as required.
Doing this saves you the work of duplicating any code which will be common between your new file and the existing files in your framework, such as the calls to include files.

When to Use a Plugin Instead

Another option you have when creating sites based on your framework is to use plugins in conjunction with your child themes. A plugin won’t replace a child theme completely, but it can be useful in the following circumstances:

The functionality you want to add isn’t theme-dependent (i.e. you want to keep it if the site ever changes theme in future). This might include registering custom post types or taxonomies, for example.
You want to use this functionality on a number of the sites you create, but not enough for it to go into a starter child theme or the framework itself.
I’ll cover developing plugins for your framework in the next part of this series.

Summary

Your theme framework is just the starting point of a library of code and files you’ll create to support the sites you develop. Each site you create will need to run on a child theme, which will have your framework theme as its parent.

As we’ve seen, your child themes will add their own styling and functionality, and they can do this by hooking into the action and filter hooks in your framework, or via the creation of new template files. It’s always a good idea to adopt the solution which needs the least code, as that makes your site faster and your life easier!

from :http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/creating-child-themes-for-your-wordpress-theme-framework–cms-21933

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